Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Name the Banned Book Contest: Question 2

The Birmingham Public Library is conducting a contest to celebrate Banned Books Week, September 30-October 6. Check the BPL blog every day during Banned Books Week and guess the passage from a book that was banned in America. If you guess correctly, your name will go in a drawing for prizes and the winners will be announced on the blog Monday, October 8.. Prizes include library totes, gift certificates to the Friends Bookstore, a Friends gift membership, and a drawing for a book bag or T-shirt of your choice from the Friends Bookstore. Good luck!

Trivia Question 2: What juvenile book that tackles the stress of religion and prepubescence is this passage from?

Then I got dressed and looked at myself in the mirror. Would anyone know my secret? Would it show? Would Moose, for instance, know if I went back outside to talk to him? Would my father know it right away when he came home for dinner? I had to call Nancy and Gretchen and Janie right away. Poor Janie! She'd be the last of the PTS's to get it. And I'd been so sure it would be me! How about that! Now I am growing for sure. Now I am almost a woman!

Post your answer in the comments section. Comments will remain hidden until the next morning when the answer is revealed.


Answer to yesterday's trivia question:

In Cold Bloo
d is the archetype for many true crime books that followed. Instead of a dry “facts only” story about the gruesome shotgun murders of Herbert Clutter, his wife, Bonnie, and their two children, 16-year-old Nancy, and 15-year-old Kenyon, Truman Capote wrote a nonfiction story that reads like a mystery through the process of injecting the facts with assumptive conversations and imagined scenarios—a "nonfiction novel," if you will. Capote was accompanied to Holcomb, Kansas, by Harper Lee, who served as an assistant researcher and was instrumental in getting Holcomb to open up to Capote and talk about the Clutters.

In Cold Blood was banned from the Windsor Forest High School in Savannah, Georgia, in 1999, but later reinstated after the community protested its removal. The complaint about the book that was part of an Advanced Placement English Class concerned the sex, violence, and profanity in it.


TaLandria Nation said...

Are you there God, it's me Margaret

Anonymous said...

Are you there God its me Margaret

Shelly said...

"Are You There God? It's Me Margaret" by Judy Blume.

Woman of Amber said...

Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
Great book: used it as extra reading a couple years in my classroom, but never actually taught it...

Tressa said...

Correct, ladies and Anonymous. Way to go. At 47 I still pick this book up and flip through it occasionally. Good times.

"We must, we must, we must increase our bust!"