Thursday, August 14, 2014

Genealogy for Kids

Now that “back to school” is in full swing, this might be a good time to introduce your children to a new subject: their own family. Genealogy is a great way for families to spend time together and can be a particularly special way for children to bond with their older relatives. It also provides opportunities to teach important research skills and to impart a love of history in children at an early age.

Starting a genealogy project with your children can be as simple as writing down the names of their parents and grandparents, along with their places of birth and other important dates. Fill out a genealogy chart together to see how much you already know and to get an idea of where you need to look next. If your child has older relatives nearby, have him or her conduct an “interview” in which he asks about their life. Hearing how their grandparents studied, worked, and had fun will make history personal for them.

By taking information about their family and piecing it together, children of all ages are gaining valuable research skills. Not all families are easy to track down and doing so requires using many different sources (both print and online). Learning to use and evaluate the information they find will serve them well as they progress in their education.

Many people find that genealogy makes them feel more connected to the places their ancestors lived and to history. Putting our ancestors into their historical context helps us to understand them and turns them into real people rather than just names and dates. Wanting to know more about their family naturally leads children (and adults) to the study of the towns, states, and countries their ancestors came from.

For more information about starting a family genealogy project, visit our new Genealogy for Kids subject guide. It includes links to books, websites, craft projects, and charts. You can also visit the Library’s Southern History Department for free classes and help anytime you need it.

M.B. Newbill
Southern History Department
Central Library

No comments: