Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Bad Girls Book Club

Bad Girls Book Club 2014
Wilmington, North Carolina

Every December, my sister-in-law sends her brother and me a year’s summary of her Bad Girls Book Club selections. Their choices have served me well in my reading, and sometimes they have chosen my recommendations as well. These women are serious readers, but perhaps not so “bad.” They are “bad” in the sense of “awesome” as they seek literary fiction and engage in in thoughtful, rigorous, and lively discussion. Being a “bad” boy, I would have to be a fly on the wall to actually attend. Knowing three of them well, I am certain that I am missing out on interesting discussions and fabulous food and libations.

Nonetheless, we can all partake of their excellent and inviting selections.

January: The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

An almost 800-page Dickensonian tale of love, identity and art; beautifully written and hard to put down.









February: The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri


Set in India and America and beginning in the 1960s, this is the unforgettable story of two brothers and a country torn apart by revolution.







March: The Cleaner of Chartres by Salley Vickers

Set in modern France, this is the story of Agnes Morel (who was found in a basket by an old farmer), the great cathedral of Chartres, and the many characters who weave together in the old town of Chartres. Agnes carries a mystery as she quietly goes about her tasks. What is it? [This was one of my recommendations to Suzanne and her book group and it proved to be a big hit. Visit here to read a previous blog piece wherein I reviewed this intriguing novel.]


April: The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman

Historic fiction set in the 1900s in New York City. This is a love story set at a Coney Island freak show and at the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory.








May: Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

Set in a tiny village in England. After a tragic accident, a very successful young man becomes a quadriplegic. An ordinary girl from the village comes to care for him.








June/July: The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

Beginning in 1803, this is the story of two young girls in Charleston. One is an urban slave; the other is from a wealthy, aristocratic family.








August/September: Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

Set in 1987, the story of a 14-year-old girl and her relationship to an adored uncle who dies of a disease her mother can barely talk about.







October: We Are Called to Rise by Laura McBride

Set in modern Los Vegas, a story about how even the smallest things we do have meaning.









November/December: The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

Set in the 1800s, this beautifully written novel includes history, botany, love, and magic.








To learn more about online and local book groups, visit here.

David Blake
Fiction Department
Central Library

No comments: