Wednesday, February 25, 2009

An Evening with Thom Gossom Jr.

thom gossom jr.
Enjoy readings and conversation with Thom Gossom Jr., whose career spans television, stage, screen, and now the printed page.

Thom Gossom is an actor, writer, and communications professional. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, Gossom received his Bachelor of Arts in communication from Auburn University, where he was the second black football player and perhaps the first black athlete to walk on and earn a scholarship in the Southeastern Conference. He later went on to earn a Master of Arts in communication from the University of Montevallo.

After a brief time in the NFL and in public relations for Bellsouth, Gossom started his own public relations firm in 1987 to supplement his writing and acting ventures. Gossom is a self-described working actor, having appeared on stage, television, and film. His theatre roles include Fences, American Buffalo, and Glengarry Glen Ross. Film credits include Fight Club, Miss Evers' Boys, and The Chamber. On television he had recurring roles on In the Heat of the Night, Boston Legal, and Close to Home, and played the title character, Israel, in an Emmy-winning episode of NYPD Blue titled “Lost Israel.”

His writing credits include his critically acclaimed one-man show, Speak of Me As I Am, and his recently published memoir, Walk-On: My Reluctant Journey to Integration. He has also written articles and columns for The Birmingham News, The Birmingham Times, and Fun and Stuff and Down Home magazines.

Event Information
What: An Evening with Thom Gossom, Jr.
When: Thursday, March 12
Time: 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Where: Central Library, Auditorium
Cost: $10 per person (advance reservations required)

Light refreshments will be served.

This is an event of Writing Today Writers' Conference, March 13-14, on the campus of Birmingham-Southern College. Register online or call 205-226-4921 to receive printed registration materials.

Writing Today is supported by the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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