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Showing posts from February, 2012

Library Releases New African American Booklist

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The Birmingham Public Library (BPL) hosted a series of programs focusing on the arts in February—visual arts, performing arts, language arts, and theatre arts. Now as it wraps up programming for Black History Month, BPL continues to highlight the arts by showcasing literary works with the release of its annual publication the African American Booklist.

This 2012 publication includes 115 book titles—with brief descriptions—of works published last year by and about African Americans. "The African American Booklist is a compilation of our librarians’ reading suggestions. Our goal in creating and publishing the list is to help patrons make choices on what to read next,” states Renee Blalock, Director of the Birmingham Public Library. The publication includes titles for adults, teens, and youth, along with a list of top ten titles in the BPL collection. Copies of the African American Booklist are free and available at the Central Library downtown and all BPL branch locations.

'Beary' Loved Author Dies

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Most of us have the Berenstain Bears to thank for helping us through childhood issues such as fear of going to the doctor, dealing with bullies, and resolving sibling rivalries. In the 50 years, 300 titles, and 260 million copies, our endearing ursine family has been a part of many story times and childhoods. This past Friday, half of the husband-wife team of this successful children’s literature, Jan Berenstain, died in Solebury, PA, after suffering a stroke. She was 88. Her husband, Stan, passed in 2005 at the age of 82.

Born Janice Grantin in Philadelphia, Mrs. Berenstain met her future husband in an art class at the Philadelphia Museum of Industrial Art in 1941. She completed her studies at the Philadelphia College of Art as Mr. Berenstain served as a medical artist in the Army during World War II. They were married in 1946 and began their collaboration on cartoons for the Saturday Evening Post and Colliers. It is said that Mr. Berenstain contributed the humor and she for the heart…

Branch News

The Woodlawn Branch Library will be closed to the public Wednesday, February 29 thru Friday, March 2 due to AC problems. The library is tentatively planned to reopen Monday, March 5.

BPL's neighborhood libraries—Ensley, Inglenook, North Avondale, Powderly, Woodlawn, and Wylam—will return to their regular scheduled hours of 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Monday, March 5.

Today's Brown Bag Lunch Program: The Fight Continues in an Unlikely Place: African American Comic Art

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Jeffreen Hayes, Curator of African-American art at the Birmingham Museum of Art, will discuss the work of two African American comic artists: Brumsic Brandon Jr. and Aaron McGruder. Wednesday, February 29, noon.

Feed your body and mind at BPL's
Brown Bag Lunch programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium.

WORD UP! Poetry Series Spotlights Southeast’s Top Talents

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In an era where it can be challenging to get the attention of high-school students, the WORD UP! Poetry Slam has garnered both their attention and involvement. Launched in partnership with high schools in Jefferson County, WORD UP! marks its fifth anniversary in April 2012. As the preliminary student competition gets underway—this competition will occur at participating high schools through the end of March—the Birmingham Public Library (BPL) will host WORD UP! The Art of the Word on Tuesday evenings in March at 6:30 p.m. in the Richard Arrington, Jr. Auditorium of the Central Library, showcasing the talents of noted poets throughout the Southeast.

M. Ayodele Heath
The Art of the Word series kicks off on March 6 with Atlanta native M. Ayodele Heath, author of Otherness (Brick Road Poetry Press, 2010). Heath is a graduate of the MFA program at New England College and is the two-time Southeastern Regional Slam Champion and top-10 finisher at the National Poetry Slam.

Kevin Young
The March…

Exhibition Focused on “Simpler Times” Opens at Central Library

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Though material possessions were limited in the rural area where Maurice Cook grew up, his family was rich in love, warmth, and compassion for one another. These are the elements and emotions reflected in his exhibition Simpler Times: The Paintings of Maurice Cook. This show by the Birmingham resident and folk artist who grew up in Carbon Hill opens in the Fourth Floor Gallery of the Central Library on Tuesday, February 28, and runs through Friday, April 13.

Cook is self-taught and his work depicts people enjoying life and activities typically found throughout the rural South. One of the characteristics of Cook’s art is that although the activities are easily identified, the people are anonymous—they do not have faces. He paints them without facial features to create images that can be universal. Cook explains, “I want all people to relate to my paintings. I try to tell the story with body language.”

He began painting professionally in 1994. Working primarily in acrylics, Cook’s art is …

Bards & Brews Returns to Central Library March 2

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Birmingham Public Library’s (BPL) popular Bards & Brews poetry performance and beer tasting series returns to its place of origin on Friday, March 2. Held the first Friday of each month, the March edition of Bards & Brews heads back home to the Central Library as an OPEN MIC event rather than a poetry slam. The musical entertainment will be provided by singer/songwriter and guitar player Kurt Jenkins beginning at 6:30 p.m. Brian “Voice Porter” Hawkins is the emcee. He will deftly guide both novice and veteran poets through an evening of verbal banter ranging from comic to social commentary starting at 7:00 p.m. The Central Library is located at 2100 Park Place.

Bards & Brews is one of the ways the Birmingham Public Library is reaching out to a younger demographic. The craft beer movement in which beer is elevated to the level of fine wine as something to be savored and appreciated has really taken hold especially among the younger generation. The pairing of beer tas…

Basic Home Repair Class Offered at Powderly Library

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Saundra Hill demonstrating home repair how-to.

Are you a senior citizen having problems with basic home repairs? Is your drain clogged? Do you have lights that that need replacing but can't be reached? The seniors at Powderly Branch Library have been learning how to handle all these tasks and more. Saundra Hill of Wiggins Recreation Center has been teaching seniors basic home repairs. Meetings are held the third Friday of each month from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. The next class on Friday, March 16, is “Circuit Breakers and Changing Fuses.”

Life Before Sookie Stackhouse

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“You’re different,” he said. “What are you?” . . . “Well. I’m Sookie Stackhouse, and I’m a waitress,” I told him. “What’s your name?” . . . “Bill,” he said.Dead Until Dark (2001) by Charlaine Harris

If you’re a fan of the TV show True Blood, I’m sure you know all about Sookie and Bill. What you may not know is that long before Charlaine Harris wrote her first Sookie Stackhouse novel, she was writing a mystery series featuring librarian-turned-detective Aurora Teagarden. The first Aurora Teagarden novel, Real Murders, was published in 1990. Due to the success of True Blood and the Sookie Stackhouse books, Harris’s Aurora Teagarden series is being republished in hardcover. The new hardcover edition of Real Murders was released in 2010 and books two through four were released in 2011. Book five of the series, Dead Over Heels, will be released in March. If you like Charlaine Harris, check out this series and follow the adventures of Aurora Teagarden.




Real Murders -- One of the members of Au…

Brown Bag Lunch Program: The Fight Continues in an Unlikely Place: African American Comic Art

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Jeffreen Hayes, Curator of African-American art at the Birmingham Museum of Art, will discuss the work of two African American comic artists: Brumsic Brandon Jr. and Aaron McGruder. Wednesday, February 29, noon.

Feed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Lunch programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium.

The Art of Science March Programs: Science of Geometry

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A futuristic structure of someplace
Not your typical stick and stone.
Each triangle unit’s face
Creates a geodesic dome.

Participants will learn about the science of geometry and work together to create a geodesic dome.

The Art of Science is a grant-funded after-school program conducted by Elinor and Winfield Burks at six Birmingham Public Library branches: Avondale, East Lake, Five Points West, Ensley, Powderly, and Springville Road. The program will run nine months—from September 2011 through December 2012—and will cover the science of nutrition, geometry, sound, plants, optics, recycling, and materials engineering in a hands-on atmosphere. Each program will begin with a science principle and end with a craft or group project. Supplies for the crafts are provided.

At each session, the library will showcase books and videos about the program’s topic, and introduce age-appropriate databases for children to further explore what they learned at each program.

The Art of Science is made possible…

Latest in Urban Fiction

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For all my Urban Fiction fans out there, here is a sample of what you can expect to find in the library soon. All descriptions are from the publisher.






















Baltimore Chronicles, Vol. 4 by Treasure Hernandez

Scar Johnson is the biggest drug dealer in Baltimore, and with the help of his girlfriend, who happens to be a District Attorney, he has become the most untouchable. But is he really safe? The mysterious observer has come out of the shadows and infiltrated the Dirty Money Crew. Together with his accomplice, he plans to exact revenge on Scar.

Bi-Curious, Vol. 2: Life After Sadie by Natalie Weber

Weber delivers the powerful and provocative tale of a woman whose bi-curious nature gets her into more trouble than she can escape.

Deception by Naomi Chase

Acquitted of murder, Tamia Luke is on a mission to reclaim all she’s lost, including her ex, Brandon, who saved her life. Brandon’s about to get married, but Tamia’s determined, even if it means resorting to deception. Her sister, Fiona, betrayed T…

Simply Adele

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At a time when we have lost many popular female singers including such greats as Etta James, Teena Marie, Amy Winehouse, and Whitney Houston, a young singer/songwriter has emerged from relative obscurity to win the musical hearts and minds of many new fans worldwide.

Offering the raspiness of a Janis Joplin or Bonnie Raitt, yet with a polish worthy of Lisa Stansfield, she has become the latest iteration of blue-eyed soul.

Adele Laurie Blue Adkins, now widely known simply as Adele, was born in north London to a single mother on May 5, 1988. During her childhood the two moved about the edges of London under modest circumstances with little fanfare, though Adele did show musical aptitude at an early age. In 2006 a friend of hers posted a demonstration of her talent onto Myspace that led to her discovery by a professional agent.

She released her first album in early 2008 at the age of 19 appropriately titled 19, and became an immediate hit with the British public. Her reception in the United…

Book Signing Featuring Children's Author Cynthia Levinson at Central Library Tonight at 6:30

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Nationally known children’s author Cynthia Levinson will speak and sign copies of her new book We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March (Peachtree Publishers, 2012) at the Central Library, Thursday, February 23, at 6:30 p.m. In her book, written for young readers age ten and up, Levinson tells the story of four young civil rights activists who took part in the Birmingham demonstrations. Three of those activists, James W. Stewart (age 15 in 1963), Arnetta Streeter (age 16 in 1962), and Washington Booker III (age 14 in 1963), will join the author to share their memories.

Copies of We’ve Got a Job will be available for purchase and signing ($15.00). The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information contact Jim Baggett, jbaggett@bham.lib.al.us or 205-226-3631.

One of Three Women to Play in Negro League Shares Her Story

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Mamie “Peanut” Johnson is Featured Black History Month Speaker

During an era when playing professional sports was filled with obstacles for women and African Americans, Mamie “Peanut” Johnson was one of just three women to play in the Negro League. Now 77 years-old, Johnson will take her anticipated audience of middle-school students and others on a journey back in time to when she was a 100 pound ballplayer breaking into the game. Come out and celebrate Black History Month and baseball with the Birmingham Public Library on Monday, February 27 at 10:00 a.m. in the Richard Arrington Auditorium of the Central Library. Johnson’s autobiography, A Strong Right Arm written by Michelle Y. Green, will be available for purchase and signing.

Johnson’s skill, passion, and commitment to play scored her a spot on the roster of the Indianapolis Clowns. In 1953 Bish Tyson, a former Negro League player, observed Johnson practicing. Recognizing her athletic abilities, he suggested she play professional …

Today's Brown Bag Lunch Program: Plays on the Go

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Christi Toyer, Artistic Director of Plays on the Go Touring Company, will offer an energetic exploration of poetry, song, and dance as a cultural and traditional journey through the lives of African Americans who have survived hardships, and who are living with hope and believing in a dream. Wednesday, February 22, noon.

Feed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Lunch programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium.

Remembering Whitney Houston

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During the mid-1980s, I recall buying many hits of a new singer on the block named Whitney Houston, whose slow powerhouse ballads would always tug on the heart strings. Not only could she sing, but she was a beautiful caramel honey that all of my male classmates in high school dreamed of meeting. Some of her early hits included “Saving All My Love For You,” “You Give Good Love,” and “The Greatest Love of All,” and were released from her debut album, Whitney Houston. These ballads were infused with fiery gospel fervor and pop appeal that appealed to not only the black music market but to the mainstream as well. Whitney could also spin out songs such as “How Will I Know” that would get you moving on the dance floor and turn them into hit records. The hits from her debut album had seven consecutive U.S. number ones, which surpassed the Beatles' record. The album sold three million copies its first year in the U.S. and went on to sell 25 million worldwide, winning her the first of six…

Friends Bookstore News

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Dear Bookstore Patrons,

We've just received a new supply of best sellers, including:

James Patterson, Christmas Wedding
Catherine Coulter, Prince of Ravenscar
Iris Johanson, Bonnie
Nicholas Sparks, The Best of Me
James Lee Burke, Feast Day of Fools
Danielle Steel, Hotel Vendome
John Sanford, Shock Wave

Also, we have a couple of book sets that are not on display, but may be of interest. We have a 20 volume Authors Digest, 1908 edition, a monogram edition certified in Vol. I to have been prepared for Henrietta M. Sample. The digest contains examples of the writings of many great authors. Comparable sets have dealer prices at various on-line sites of $125 to $185. We received this set through a donation from the family of Mary Anderson Tutwiler. We have priced the set for $45.00.

We also received a 10 volume set of Source Book Encyclopedia, dated 1931, which describes itself as "an international encyclopedic authority written from the New World Viewpoint prepared by over two hundred autho…

BPL Archivist Reviews Book on Birmingham Children's March

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Revolutions are made by small groups of people. Most American colonists did not fight the British. And in Birmingham most people, black and white, sat out the street protests that helped end legally sanctioned racial segregation. During the Civil Rights demonstrations of April and May 1963, a few more than 1,000 adults were arrested. Not enough to fill the jails and force white officials to negotiate a truce. The shock troops of the Birmingham movement were children and teenagers who marched and were arrested by the thousands — no one is sure how many. Cynthia Levinson tells their story in We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March (Peachtree Publishers, 2012).

Writing for young readers age 10 and up, Levinson looks at the 1963 protests through the experiences of four young demonstrators: Audrey Faye Hendricks (age 9), James W. Stewart (age 15), Arnetta Streeter (age 16) and Washington Booker III (known as Wash, age 14). Levinson, who writes for several children’s magazines,…

Last Week to Visit the African American History Makers Quilt Exhibition

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Elegance, Lumumba's representation of Barack and Michelle Obama

Aisha Lumumba's quilts will be displayed in the Central Library's Fourth Floor Gallery through Friday, February 24. Don't miss your chance to see these African American heritage quilts in person. Lumumba has been quilting since she was a teenager, and the more than 25 years of experience show in her quilted pop culture images of Whoopi Goldberg; Biggie Smalls; Oprah Winfrey and her BFF, Gail King; Jamie Foxx as Ray Charles; Halle Berry; Hattie McDaniel, the first African American to win an Academy Award for her role in Gone with the Wind; and many others.

A native of McDonough, Georgia, Lumumba now resides in Atlanta. She is a member of the Brown Sugar Stitchers Quilt Guild, the Ebony Stitchers Quilt Guild, Black Art in America, and African Americans for the Arts. Her quilts are in the collections of Ambassador Andrew Young, The Atrium on Sweet Auburn, and President & Mrs. Obama.

Research Your House at the Central Library

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A house on Indian Hill Road, Vestavia, 1961...
and in 2012.
You’ve just purchased an old house and you want to research its history. So where do you start? First, it’s important to note that not every home will have documentation of historic significance. Keeping that in mind, the Central Library offers several avenues to start your research.

Your first step will be to obtain a parcel ID for the property you are researching. If you own your property, you should be able to find the ID number in your closing documents or on your property tax bill. If you are unable to locate the parcel ID, you can go to the Business, Science & Technology Department at the Central Library and use the RealQuest database to obtain the ID number. The RealQuest database also provides detailed property profiles, parcel maps, and street map plus.

After obtaining the parcel ID, you can go to the Archives Department to see if they have Board of Equalization records on your property. According to the Archives Dep…

Brown Bag Lunch Program: Plays on the Go

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Christi Toyer, Artistic Director of Plays on the Go Touring Company, will offer an energetic exploration of poetry, song, and dance as a cultural and traditional journey through the lives of African Americans who have survived hardships, and who are living with hope and believing in a dream. Wednesday, February 22, noon.

Feed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Lunch programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium.

Libraries Use Poetry Therapy as Post-Storm Rx

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The Birmingham Public Library’s (BPL) “Voices from the Storms” takes a page from the Operation Homecoming writing program for military veterans as an initiative to aid survivors of the tornadoes in central Alabama in 2011 and 2012. “Voices from the Storms” encourages area residents to turn to expressive writing to share their thoughts and emotions as part of the post-tornado healing process. Originally slated to end in January, the deadline for submitting an original poem, short story, or essay has been extended to March 31. You may e-mail your submissions to Haruyo Miyagawa, Arts/Literature/Sports Department, Central Library at hm@bham.lib.al.us or you can turn in hard copies at any Jefferson County public library. All submissions will be posted to the Jefferson County Library Cooperative website: www.jclc.org. John Paul Taylor, executive director of Real Life Poets, will select the works that will be compiled and included in a paper anthology that will be available to library p…

Lady Hip-Hop History Kicks Off Black History Month at Smithfield Library

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Lady Hip-Hop History surrounded by some of her dance partners.

Candice Hardy a.k.a. Lady Hip-Hop History gave a lesson on the origin of dance from Africa through songs, poetry, and interactive dance at the Smithfield Branch Library on February 11. In Black History Speaks: Dancing Through Our Past, Hardy compared and contrasted stepping, salsa and hip-hop dancing to African dance while encouraging her audience to join in. This was the first program in a series at Smithfield Library that celebrates Black History Month.

February programs at Smithfield Branch Library:

Music of the Mines, Mills, and Railroads of the Birmingham District: Sloss Furnaces Presenter Depicts Labor-Related Music of the Birmingham District
Thursday, February 9, 2012
10:00 a.m.
Migrants pouring into Birmingham’s industrial district, whether from the cotton fields of the Mississippi Delta or the Appalachian hills, carried with them their unique styles of music, as well as their unique traditions and culture.

National …

Downloadable eBooks and Audiobooks—Not Just for Fiction

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The Arts, Literature, and Sports Department (ALS) has been acquiring downloadable eBooks and audiobooks for several months now on a variety of subjects to appeal to the varied interests of our readers. Fascinated by the lives of the rich and/or famous? Try a biography of Ice-T or Clint Eastwood. Need a mood pick-me-up? Try Adam Corolla's In Fifty Years We'll All Be Chicks, Maggie Rowe's Dirty Laundry, or Dave Barry's I'll Mature When I'm Dead. For the sports enthusiasts we have Gene Chizik's All In. If you're a music aficionado, you can download Life by Keith Richards.

If you have not already tried an eBook or audiobook from the ALS Department, spring break is rapidly approaching, and summer will soon be here. Vacation would be a great time to load up the Nook, Kindle, MP3, or smartphone and give downloadables a try. We think you'll be glad you did.

Submitted by Arts, Literature, and Sports Department
Central Library

Civil Rights Activists and Author at BPL

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Nationally known children’s author Cynthia Levinson will speak and sign copies of her new book We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March (Peachtree Publishers, 2012) at the Central Library, Thursday, February 23, at 6:30 p.m. In her book, written for young readers age ten and up, Levinson tells the story of four young civil rights activists who took part in the Birmingham demonstrations. Three of those activists, James W. Stewart (age 15 in 1963), Arnetta Streeter (age 16 in 1962), and Washington Booker III (age 14 in 1963), will join the author to share their memories.

Cynthia Levinson joins a long list of hundreds of authors who have researched books in the collections of the Birmingham Public Library (BPL) Archives. These authors spend hours, months, or even years working closely with Archives staff. Reflecting on her research, Levinson says, “The book would not have been so comprehensive or revealing without the expertise of the library staff. In addition to providing e…

Do you love Downton Abbey?

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Picture walking down a winding path leading to a beautiful Edwardian style country estate. There's beauty behind the British interior walls, but also wicked secrets. Please, stop by for a spot of English tea and stroll through the magnificent English gardens. Don't rush, there's so much to see and learn.

The year is 1911; the extravagant Highclere Castle is the setting. We follow the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants during the reign of King George V. The first series follows the family through the two years before the Great War, beginning with the news of the sinking of the Titanic. From social life and customs during this period, to beautiful scenery, extravagant costuming, intrigue and delicious gossip, we love Downton Abbey.

If you love the PBS Primetime Emmy Award winning series, Downton Abbey, you might also consider checking out these books and dvds at your local library. If you haven't watched this series, get started today. We look forward to your v…

Today's Brown Bag Lunch Program: Women in the Media

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Malena Cunningham is President and CEO of Strategic Media Relations, Inc. In this one-hour segment, she shares her experiences as an award-winning journalist. Prior to launching Strategic Media Relations, Cunningham was evening news anchor for NBC13 covering numerous high profile stories including every gubernatorial race in Alabama since 1992 during her 12-year stint at NBC13. Cunningham is author of Savvy Leadership Strategies for Women; the book will be available for purchase and signing by the author. Wednesday, February 15, noon.

Feed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Lunch programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium.

Friends Bookstore News

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Greetings from the Friends Bookstore staff,

This month we're highlighting the Friends Bookstore gift shop.

To encourage you to check out items with our Friends logo, we have a special on our Aztec mug and soup cup with spoon. Regularly $5.95 and $7.95 each, we're dropping the .95 from each item and pairing them for only $12.00 for the rest of this month.

Also, check out our Friends water bottle for $10.95, our white ceramic Friends mug for $4.95, and our "sticky notebook" for $2.95. We also have a lovely metal bookmark with our logo.

We have Friends T-shirts in both red and green adult sizes and pink and green children sizes for $12.95, and a Friends tote bag that is $12.95 as well. We also have other library T-shirts and bags for less.

We have lightly used donated gift items such as candles and candle holders, puzzles, stuffed animals, journals, picture frames, and more.

And we have some of our nicer and more unusual books that are specially priced—to raise just a litt…

Unsung African American Opera Star Camilla Williams Is Silenced At The Age of 92

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We still have Leontyne Price, Kathleen Battle, Jessye Norman, Denyce Graves, and Barbara Hendricks, to name a few of the most famous African American opera divas of today, but there were great ones before these who paved the way. Before Marian Anderson there was Camilla Williams.

Williams performed the role of the doomed heroine Cio-Cio-San in Puccini’s Madama Butterfly on May 15, 1946, at City Center in Manhattan. She was the first black woman to secure a contract with a major United States opera company, a distinction widely ascribed in the public memory to the contralto Marian Anderson. This performance gained rave reviews and came nearly a decade before Marian Anderson sang at the Metropolitan Opera.

Although she was too well-mannered to boast about her deserved accolades in history, it caused her great private anguish. “The lack of recognition for my accomplishments used to bother me, but you cannot cry over those things,” Miss Williams said in a 1995 interview with the opera schol…

Gardening from Seeds

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It’s not too early. If you’ve been studying seed catalogs all winter and have already bought your peat pots, you know what I mean. It’s almost time to start seeds indoors! The Old Farmer's Almanac has some helpful tips in "Starting Seeds Indoors," as does Fine Gardening's "10 Seed-Starting Tips."

Most seeds can be started about six weeks before the last frost date, so you have about a month left to decide which varieties of peppers, tomatoes, and squash you want to start, or maybe you’re more interested in zinnias or cosmos. Whether you choose to plant flowers or vegetables, the library has the books for you. There are books on container gardening, vertical gardening, raising vegetables on your balcony, organic gardening, heirloom seeds, flowers for sun or shade, propagation, pruning, composting, and everything in between.

Start reading now to get a jump start on spring gardening.

Submitted by Business, Science & Technology Department
Central Library

Black History Web Resources for 2012-- sampling from BPL staff

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Part of the work that Birmingham Public Librarians are doing in this digital age is finding the best- and therefore most credible- resources on the Internet (sort of the wheat-from-the-chaff analogy). Librarians have sometimes even been called the original search engines.

One of my former bosses, a wise and modest BPL librarian, keeps a famous quotation by Samuel Johnson next to her desk: "Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it."

Each year as we celebrate African American History Month, BPL is flooded with worthy assignments from young scholars across the city of Birmingham. In order to help these students, the librarians at BPL have sifted through hundreds of websites on Black History and chosen a few which have been helpful.

We hope that you'll enjoy them and as Thomas Jefferson once said, you will be "bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results the…