Friday, March 27, 2009

Storytellers Among Us

eve parkerA recent Birmingham News article reminded us how important storytelling is as an art form. After all, until Unknown thought to write down the epic story of Beowulf in AD 1000, stories were passed down by oral tradition.

Eve Parker—pictured above hamming it up with pre-fried-peanut-butter-sandwich Elvis—belongs to a group of eight storytellers who work for the Birmingham Public Library. Local storytellers are instrumental in luring folks out of their homes and into libraries and other venues, creating a stronger sense of community.

Alabama native and master storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham has been promoting the oral tradition of storytelling for decades, spooking generations of children with her southern ghost tales. She sees storytelling as a demonstration of affection—"I love you enough to tell you something that means a great deal to me."

A gala will be held in honor of Windham on March 29, at 3:00 p.m. at The Virginia Samford Theatre. The gala will benefit The Seasoned Performers at the UAB Center for Aging. The library has had the pleasure of hosting the Seasoned Performers at BPL's Brown Bag Programs.

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Historian John Hope Franklin Dies

John Hope Franklin photo courtesy Duke University
Dr. John Hope Franklin
1915-2009


Historian Dr. John Hope Franklin, pioneer of African-American studies, author of the seminal work on the black experience in the U.S., and civil rights activist who worked on the landmark Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education outlawing public school segregation, died yesterday.

Professor Franklin's landmark book From Slavery to Freedom integrated black history into American history and is still in print 60 years later and is in its 7th edition. His numerous other publications include The Emancipation Proclamation, The Militant South, The Free Negro in North Carolina, Reconstruction After the Civil War, A Southern Odyssey: Travelers in the Ante-bellum North, Race and History: Selected Essays, 1938-1988, The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-first Century, and his latest book My Life and an Era: The Autobiography of Buck Colbert Franklin.

Dr. Franklin was also a part of the team of scholars who assisted Thurgood Marshall to win Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 case that outlawed the "separate but equal" doctrine in the nation's public schools.

To read more about the life and work of this great American see the links below.

Bibliography (in chronological order)

The Free Negro in North Carolina, 1790-1860
From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans
The Militant South, 1800-1860
Reconstruction After the Civil War
The Emancipation Proclamation
Land of the Free
A Southern Odyssey: Travelers in the Antebellum North
Racial Equality in America
George Washington Williams: A Biography
Race and History: Selected Essays 1938-1988
The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-first Century
African Americans and the Living Constitution
The Diary of James T. Ayers: Civil War Recruiter
My Life and an Era: The Autobiography of Buck Colbert Franklin
Runaway Slaves: Rebels on the Plantation
In Search of the Promised Land: A Slave Family in the Old South
Mirror to America: The Autobiography of John Hope Franklin

Links:

Duke's John Hope Franklin Web Site
Book TV Interview with John Hope Franklin
Oral History Interview with John Hope Franklin, July 27, 1990
New York Times John Hope Franklin Obituary

Databases:

John Hope Franklin (searches subscription databases)

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Web 2.0 and Books

Web 2.0 image Before jumping into Web 2.0 and books, let’s have a quick primer about 2.0. The best way to understand Web 2.0 may be through examples. While you might not be able to spit out a quick dictionary definition (btw Websters does define it as “the second generation of the World Wide Web in which content is user-generated and dynamic, and software is offered that mimics desktop programs”) you could probably recognize Web 2.0 if you saw it.

Web 2.0 incorporates social aspects into Web sites by allowing users to create, in part, the Web site itself. Examples? Visit delicious to see a social network of shared bookmarks from the web. Visit listography to see people’s lists of all sorts shown and shared. You can also use the web to store and share digital images that show off your marvelous photography skills on flickr or snapfish. There’s YouTube for video and Instructables for “how to." But what about books? Well you’ll be happy to know there are many wonderful ways to explore, catalog, list, track and share your books online.

Two of the main Web sites most are familiar with are Librarything and Goodreads. All you need to get started is an email address and pick a user name and the process is very simple. So what do these sites have to offer bibliophiles? For starters Librarything allows users to catalog their entire library by simply entering the book titles. It does the rest for you; plugging in details, book covers, etc. If you want to get technical and use a catalog number you can choose between Dewey and Library of Congress classification numbers. The site allows you to see how many people (and who they are!) that have the same interesting books that you have. It allows you to connect to these people, if you wish, and read their reviews.

I use Goodreads much more often than Librarything because it allows you to list not just what you “own” but any book you’ve read, are reading, and want to read. It is easier to navigate than Librarything and works a lot more like Amazon.com, by showing you suggestions of similar books. Adding a book is super easy. Just click the cover and add it to your “reading, read, or to read” bookshelf. You can also rate the books and review them. You can add friends to your page and compare how many books you have in common with others. You can even take literary quizzes created by other users about your favorite books (or any books really!). All of this wonderful interaction as well as being an excellent way to organize that book list you have floating around your head makes Goodreads my top pick.

However, there are numerous other lesser known book sites out there. The following link will lead you to a succinct explanation of and links to 10 wonderful sites to explore.

http://oedb.org/blogs/ilibrarian/2009/10-websites-for-book-lovers/

Lastly, be sure to check out the JCLC catalog for more books on Web 2.0 like these:

Web 2.0 and beyond: Understanding the new online business models, trends and technologies

How to do everything with your Web 2.0 blog

Web 2.0: a strategy guide

Unleashing Web 2.0: from concepts to creativity

People to people fundraising: social networking and Web 2.0 for charities

Library 2.0 and beyond: innovative technologies and tomorrow's users

Happy Reading!

Image courtesy of bensheldon at Creative Commons.

Brown Bag Program: See Rock City...and Tim Hollis, Too!

book cover
Birmingham author Tim Hollis will join us to discuss and sign his two latest books on travel and vacationing in the South: See Rock City: The History of Rock City Gardens and Selling the Sunshine State: A Celebration of Florida Tourism Advertising. Wednesday, April 1, noon.

See Also:
A 2008 BPL Blog review of Tim Hollis' book Vintage Birmingham Signs

brown bag imageFeed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in the Arrington Auditorium located on the 3rd floor of the Linn-Henley Research Library, 2100 Park Place.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Closed? No Problem.



We’re not going to lie: We love seeing you.

But occasionally, we have to close the building and lock our doors. (We need our sleep, too.) And maybe sometimes you can’t make it here while our doors are open.

Good news! It’s not necessary that you come see us in order to take advantage of our Internet-accessible databases.

The databases of Birmingham Public Library contain information on every imaginable topic. Our databases can provide full text articles from newspapers and magazines, wiring diagrams for automobile repair, encyclopedia articles, preparation for the GRE exam, critical analysis of Victorian literature, even legal forms.

With a handful of exceptions, each database is available to you, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days per year, wherever you, your computer, and your Internet connection happen to be.

If you haven’t yet, you should definitely give our – actually, your – databases a try. We have a feeling you won’t be disappointed.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Live Baby T. Rex Dinosaur To Visit Children at Central Library



Visit the Central Library for a special preview of the new smash hit arena show Walking with Dinosaurs: The Arena Spectacular, based on the award-winning BBC television series. The Arena Spectacular is now on tour in North America and will make its Birmingham premiere at BJCC Arena, Wednesday, April 1 through Sunday, April 4.

The Baby T. Rex will be greeting local children to celebrate the show’s visit to Birmingham. This amazing show features a paleontologist/narrator who takes the audience on a 90-minute journey through the 200 million year reign of these giant prehistoric creatures.

Event Details
Who: A very realistic Baby T. Rex will make a single appearance along with a spokesperson from the show who will talk about the show and the creation of the dinosaurs.
When: Tuesday, March 24 at 3:30 p.m
Where: Central Library

BPL@Night Presents Get Rhythm!

Everyone is invited to join us as BPL@Night presents Get Rhythm! at the North Birmingham Regional Library. An exiting evening of West African drumming will be presented by the Get Rhythm Performing Ensemble of percussionists and drummers under the direction of John Scalici. Light refreshments will be served.

BPL@Night has been made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts as well as by generous support by the Alabama Power Company Foundation and the Daniel Foundation of Alabama.

Details
What: Get Rhythm!
When: Tuesday, March 24
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Where: North Birmingham Regional Library

Light refreshments will be served.

BPL thanks Compass Bank for its generous support of BPL@Night. BPL@Night is also made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

BPL@Night to Feature a Performance by Carl Winters—“The Kalimba King”—at Central Library

carl wintersThe ethereal, mysterious kalimba, a.k.a. the African thumb piano, is often misunderstood, misinterpreted, and mistaken for being a museum piece or trinket. Consequently, Carl Winters has been inspired to develop an extensive songbook with the kalimba. His repertoire includes gospel, jazz, blues, rhythm and blues, pop, and original songs while delivering a complete solo performance. He also performs in duo, trio, quartet, and quintet configurations.

Mr. Winters attended an Earth, Wind, and Fire concert in the 1970s and became inspired to master the kalimba. He has played all over the United States. The fusion of styles that inform and create Winters’ music will remind the listener of a dream. His songs create a mood and his performances leave a lasting impression on audience members.

“The Kalimba King’s” educational and enriching programs include spoken word as well as music. Audience members will explore the kalimba’s beauty and its power in this special library performance.

For more information about Carl Winters and his unique music, visit www.kalimbaking.com.

Details
Event: BPL@Night performance by Carl Winters, “The Kalimba King”
Date: Thursday, April 9, 2009
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Place: Central Library’s Atrium
Cost: Free

Light refreshments will be served.

BPL thanks Compass Bank for its generous support of BPL@Night. BPL@Night is also made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Brown Bag Program ~ Darkness Into Life: Photography

becky seitel photo
Photo by Becky Seitel

Becky Seitel, photographer and journalist, will explain how the Holocaust, previously unknown to her, became a focus of her creative work. Her photographs depict current images of the survivors in photojournalistic style. Wednesday, March 25, noon.

brown bag imageFeed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in the Arrington Auditorium located on the 3rd floor of the Linn-Henley Research Library, 2100 Park Place.

Sunday, March 15, 2009

One More Month



As a service to the community, the Birmingham Public Library provides copies of current Federal and Alabama tax forms, instructions, and publications.

Basic forms are available at most library locations; a more extensive collection of forms is available in the Government Documents Department in the Linn-Henley Building.

Related Links:
FREE Tax Preparation at Avondale and East Lake Libraries

Tax forms and instructions may also be downloaded from the Internet.

Thursday, March 12, 2009

Brown Bag Program: Margot Tanner Speaks About Experience as Hitler Youth

hitler youth
Members of the Hitler Youth's female branch
Courtesy of AP


The Brown Bag Program Children of the Holocaust previously scheduled for March 18 has been cancelled.

Margot Tanner of Cullman, Alabama, was born in Germany and was a member of the Hitler Youth Corps. This is a unique opportunity to hear from one who lived through WWII and experienced the Nazi way of life, and who later married an American soldier, moved to the United States, and settled in Alabama. Wednesday, March 18, noon.

brown bag imageFeed your body and mind at BPL's Brown Bag Programs. You bring the lunch and we'll bring the drinks. Wednesdays at noon in the Arrington Auditorium located on the 3rd floor of the Linn-Henley Research Library, 2100 Park Place.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

The Journey of a Thousand Miles Begins with One Click

Curious about what we look like but don't want to drive all over town? Come take a tour of some of our libraries. These tours are virtual, so no need to hop in your car and fight the traffic.

Central Library
Central Library -First Floor

Five Points West Library
Five Points West Regional Library

In addition to these two libraries there are virtual tours available for Avondale, Inglenook, North Birmingham, and Springville Road. Eventually tours will be available for our other libraries, so check back with us at a later date. Virtual tour links may be found by clicking on BPL's Location and Hours page.

Monday, March 09, 2009

An Evening with Thom Gossom Jr. Cancelled

The March 12 Thom Gossom event sponsored by Birmingham-Southern's Writing Today Writer's Conference has been cancelled due to economic considerations. There is more information about the conference cancellation at Birmingham-Southern's News from the Hilltop newsletter or contact Sandy Barr at (205) 226-4921.

Libraries: Free Relief in Harsh Economic Times

Harsh economic times are driving more people to use public libraries.

As recent reports in local newspapers and on local television attest, people are visiting our library and using library services in increasing numbers.

It makes sense that public libraries have become hot spots for people who want to use the Internet, conduct job searches, update computer skills, create a resume, or check out books, DVDs, and other materials free of charge.

Visit us today and see what we can do for you.




Links

Job Search Resources

Resume Books

Computer Class Schedule


Articles

Soft economy translates to crowded Birmingham libraries (nbc13.com)

Birmingham area libraries see big upturn in activity in face of economic downturn (al.com)

Movie Review: Man on Wire (2008 DVD)

dvd cover"On August 7th 1974, a young Frenchman named Philippe Petit stepped out on a wire illegally rigged between New York’s twin towers, then the world’s tallest buildings. After nearly an hour dancing on the wire, he was arrested, taken for psychological evaluation, and brought to jail before he was finally released."

I’m surprised at how interesting some documentaries are. I mean, who would imagine that a documentary about a French high wire walker would become the critics' darling and garner so many awards? Man on Wire is filmed as a docudrama in the same vein as my favorite documentary—Touching the Void. And like Touching the Void, we know the men live to tell their stories, but that doesn’t subtract from the suspense in the least.

I don’t even know where to begin describing Man on Wire. It’s like four films rolled into one. Man on Wire is 1) a short history on the design and construction of the World Trade Center 2) a crime caper shot in black & white 3) a love story between a man, a woman, and two buildings 4) like an acquaintance's very interesting home movies.

Philippe Petit was a boy who loved to climb trees. He grew into a young man who loved to climb bridges. He became Man on Wire in 1974 when he walked 200 feet between the tallest petit on the ledge of a towerbuildings in the world. How did he get so many people to assist him in this illegal act? Petit is one of those rare, charismatic individuals who lives life on the edge and whose joy for adventure is so exhilarating that others just want to be near him. The interviews with his friends show their amazement even 34 years later at pulling off a stunt of this magnitude.

If you suffer from vertigo like I do, then you might have to turn away from the scenes of Petit and his accomplices sitting and standing on the ledges of the towers. At one point the wind is blowing so hard at that height that a photo shows Petit holding on to a pole as his body is blown horizontal.

I was disappointed that Man on Wire didn't question Petit about his feelings on the collapse of the towers on September 11. I imagine he cried like most of us did, only for different reasons.

Man on Wire is based on Philippe Petit's book To Reach the Clouds. The documentary won an Academy Award for Best Documentary, a BAFTA for Outstanding British Film, a Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award at Sundance Film Festival, and 20 more major awards.



BPL@Night to Host Vincenza Scarpaci, Author of The Journey of the Italians in America

vincenza scarpaciThe library is proud to host author Vincenza Scarpaci for a special lecture and book signing on Monday, March 30, at 6:30 p.m. in the Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium. Scarpaci used a significant amount of research materials from the Birmingham Public Library’s Archives Department for her book The Journey of the Italians in America.

Italians have influenced American life since the beginning of the new Republic. Thomas Jefferson adapted the classic Italian architecture of Andrea Palladio in designing his home and the University of Virginia; discussed agronomy and political philosophy with his neighbor, the Italian-trained physician and merchant Philip Mazzei; signed the Declaration of Independence along with William Paca of Maryland; and invited Italian musicians to form the first marine band in Washington D.C. Subsequently, millions of Italians have immigrated to the United States, bringing with them a distinct set of beliefs, traditions, and customs, which have been preserved and passed down through the generations.

Brooklyn native Vincenza Scarpaci is a writer and teacher. She graduated from Hofstra University in New York in 1961 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and went on to obtain her Ph.D. in history from Rutgers University in 1972. She has worked as a consultant, grant writer, and volunteer coordinator in addition to her considerable teaching experience at the university level. Her work has been published in journals and encyclopedias across the globe. She resides in Eugene, Oregon.

Details
Event: BPL@Night hosting author Vincenza Scarpaci
Date: Monday, March 30, 2009
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Place: Central Library’s Arrington Auditorium
Cost: Free

Light refreshments will be served.

BPL thanks Compass Bank for its generous support of BPL@Night. BPL@Night is also made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Saturday, March 07, 2009

Horton Heard a Muse

After last year's popular screening of the movie To Kill A Mockingbird at the Alabama Theater, it's fitting that the Birmingham Public Library should honor Horton Foote, who just last week, left this world at the ripe old age of 92.

Mr. Foote wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for To Kill a Mockingbird. He also created dozens of other plays and screenplays, garnering countless awards, among them the Pulitzer Prize for The Young Man from Texas.

As a man from Texas, born deep in the heart of the Gulf Coast region in 1916, Foote wrote almost exclusively about the town of his birth, Wharton, which he fictionalized as Harrison. Just days before his death, he was still working on his art. His nine-play cycle titled, Orphans’ Home Cycle, will be produced off-Broadway next season. Some theater critics claim his most recent work to be his best yet.

The Birmingham Public Library is celebrating the life of this great man of letters by offering books by Horton Foote and those about him.

Come in and check out these works and enjoy the vision and the beauty of this brilliant, American bard.

Friday, March 06, 2009

Luncheon with African-American Author Sheryll Cashin

Sheryll CashinThe Alabama Bench and Bar Historical Society and the Birmingham Public Library invite you to attend the first annual meeting and luncheon of the historical society to hear guest speaker Sheryll Cashin.

Sheryll Cashin was born and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, by parents who were political activists. She is a Professor of Law at Georgetown University, teaches such subjects as Constitutional Law and Race and American Law, and writes about race relations and inequality in America. Her new book, The Agitator’s Daughter: A Memoir of four Generations of One Extraordinary African-American Family traces the arc of American race relations through generations of her family.

book jacketProfessor Cashin worked in the Clinton White House as an advisor on urban and economic policy, particularly concerning community development in inner-city neighborhoods. She was law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Judge Abner Mikva of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. She graduated summa cum laude from Vanderbilt University in 1984 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. As a Marshall Scholar, she went on to receive a masters in English Law, with honors, from Oxford University in 1986 and a J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School, in 1989, where she was a member of the Harvard Law Review.

After the luncheon, Alabama Booksmith will host a book signing.

Date: Friday, April 17, 2009
Time: noon
Place: The Club, Birmingham, Alabama
Cost: $20.00 for ABBHS members $25.00 for non-members; Tables for eight are available for $160.00

Tickets should be reserved prior to April 3rd.

Mail checks to:
ABBHS
P.O. Box 722
Montgomery, AL 36101-0722

For more information about the luncheon:
Email Jane Garrett at rjgarrett@alabamabenchandbar.org or call 334-229-0565.

Thursday, March 05, 2009

Video: Why I Love the Birmingham Public Library



Recorded during Birmingham Public Library's Mardi Gras celebration.

Ernest Freeberg Discusses History of Dissent and Free Speech

Ernest FreebergThe Langum Charitable Trust is pleased to announce that the winner of the 2008 David J. Langum, Sr. Prize in American Legal History is Ernest Freeberg for Democracy’s Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent, published by the Harvard University Press. This prize is awarded annually to the best work of American legal history or American legal biography published by a university press, that is accessible to the educated general public, rooted in sound scholarship, and has themes that touch upon matters of general concern to the American public, past or present.

Freeberg will receive his award, which carries a stipend of $1,000, in a presentation held in the auditorium of the central branch of the Birmingham Public Library at 4:00PM, March 14, 2009. Professor Freeberg will make a few remarks concerning the writing of the book and will respond to questions. A reception will follow. The event is free of charge and the public is warmly invited.

During American participation in World War I, the Wilson administration prosecuted and jailed war critics on the specious ground that their dissent tended to interfere with recruitment of soldiers. The federal government spied on groups thought to be critical, harassed individual dissidents, and caused them to lose their jobs. The government encouraged private vigilance groups to harass, abduct and even torture American citizens because of their failure to support Wilson’s ludicrous notion of a war to end all wars.

book jacket
As leader of the Socialist Party, Eugene V. Debs became a primary target of these persecutions, and Freeberg focuses most of this well-written book on Deb’s specific story, even while relating the more general history of the repression. Debs became one of the few imprisoned dissidents whom Wilson refused to release after the war was completed, and a large-scale campaign clamored for his pardon, ultimately granted by President Harding. In this campaign, Freeberg tells us, Debs the specific became the general story, since the amnesty effort did much to engender the more expansive notions of free speech that we enjoy today.

This book has important lessons for today, when we are now concluding another war, in Iraq, that many people and groups opposed. Again the federal government spied on Americans and practiced torture. Before surrendering to utter discouragement, we might reflect on either the refusal or inability of President Bush to simply imprison those who strongly criticized his war, as predecessor Wilson had done. The sacrifices of Debs and the dissidents of that generation may have worked a permanent change in the rights of dissent and free speech during wartime. For that, and this fine account, we should be thankful. – DJL, Sr.

Details

Where: The Arrington Auditorium at the Central Library
When: Saturday, March 14, 2009
Time: 4:00 p.m.

There will be a reception following the ceremony.

2008 Honorable Mention

Honorable mention is made to Peter Charles Hoffer for the book, The Treason Trials of Aaron Burr, published by the University Press of Kansas.

This fine work vividly portrays Aaron Burr’s strange intrigues in the West and provides an illuminating account of the political and legal aspects of trials that helped to establish the principle that courts will not permit the President or Congress to manipulate the law of treason for the purpose of stifling dissent. Hoffer also demonstrates how the trials made fundamental contributions to the law of evidence and criminal procedure.

Hoffer provides fresh insights into the interactions among Burr, Thomas Jefferson, and John Marshall, and his book is an important addition to the on-going re-evaluation of Burr’s reputation.

The awards are sponsored jointly by the Friends of the Birmingham Public Library and the Langum Project For Historical Literature.

Previous winners list

David J. Langum, Sr. founded the Langum Project for Historical Literature in 2001 out of a conviction that far too many historians today write only for each other, and that there is a need to make the rich history of America, in both her colonial and national periods, accessible to the educated general public. It seeks to encourage this sort of writing by awarding two annual prizes of $1,000 apiece for the best books published by university or small presses in the category of American historical fiction ("both excellent fiction and excellent history that to some extent delineates between the two") and in the category of American legal history or legally related biography ("rooted in sound scholarship, accessible to the education general reader, and with themes that touch upon matters of general concern to the American public, past or present"). The Project is now a division of Langum Charitable Trust, a private operating foundation with 501(c)(3) status.

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

My Lists

Wouldn’t it be nice to store your own lists of library materials? Now you can keep lists of things that you would like to read, view, or listen to someday. Perhaps one list for books by a favorite author and another for CDs you’d like to check out.


Free Tickets: Walking With Dinosaurs

Walking with Dinosaurs Win Free Tickets April 1-5 at the BJCC Arena
Dinosaurs once again roam the earth in a spectacular theatrical arena show, Walking with Dinosaurs – the Arena Spectacular based on the award-winning BBC Television Series. In Walking with Dinosaurs, fifteen roaring, snarling “live” dinosaurs mesmerize the audience – and are as awe-inspiring as when they first walked the earth.

The Birmingham Public Library has partnered with Walking with Dinosaurs – The Arena Spectacular to offer patrons the opportunity to win free tickets to the April 1 show. Just drop by any Birmingham Public Library location to pick up a Design Your Own Dinosaur entry form. Participants are encouraged to draw or paint a picture of a dinosaur, complete the entry form and enter their name into a drawing for a free family four pack of tickets to the show on April 1. The deadline for entry is March 25.

In addition to the Design a Dinosaur contest the Birmingham Public Library has discount coupons for $10 off all seats (excluding $19.50 for Thursday, April 2). Pick yours up today before they become extinct.



For more information on the show visit http://www.dinosaurlive.com/ or for ticket information visit http://www.ticketmaster.com/.

BPL@Night to Feature Muse of Fire Performing Scenes from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

muse of fire actors
Scene from a 2007 Muse of Fire production at Central Library

The Birmingham Public Library is excited to bring back the popular acting troupe Muse of Fire for its March 2009 BPL@Night performance. The group will be performing scenes from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the play currently in production which Muse of Fire will feature in its entirety at Sloss Furnaces in May.

Muse of Fire is a self-described deconstructed Shakespeare project held at Birmingham’s Sloss Furnaces. The unique theatre troupe uses the surroundings of the historic facility and performs within its unconventional setting. It is a “guerrilla style of theater” and audience participation is encouraged, even expected.

Elizabeth Hunter is the founder and serves as the director of this unique experience. She has an extensive background in New York and Michigan, having both studied and directed in these locations. She won the 2007 Pauline Ireland Grant to Individual Artists.

The 2008 Spring Festival performance of Macbeth held at Sloss Furnaces was a sold-out success. Muse of Fire is carrying its momentum forward in 2009. On Thursday, March 19, Muse of Fire will entertain the library audience with a preview of its upcoming A Midsummer Night’s Dream production in a most unique location, the Atrium of Central Library. This is the third year that Muse has performed in the Atrium. The previous two years were huge successes. This year’s performance is sure to please, as Muse of Fire brings its innovative and dynamic style to the library.

Event Information
Event: Muse of Fire presents a sneak peak at A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Date: Thursday, March 19, 2009
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Place: Central Library’s Atrium
Cost: Free

Light refreshments will be served.

BPL thanks Compass Bank for its generous support of BPL@Night. BPL@Night is also made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.