Friday, May 04, 2007

Ray Bradbury awarded Pulitzer Special Citation

Ray Bradbury
Ray Doulgas Bradbury became a full-time writer in 1943, when he discovered he could make a living submitting short stories to magazines. His first book was a collection of short stories titled Dark Carnival (1947).

The launch of Sputnik in 1957 and the gathering interest in exploring the New Frontier really got the ball rolling for Bradbury's foray into the science fiction field. Even after 64 years of prolific writing that includes 500 short stories, numerous novels, poetry, plays and essays, he is still best remembered for his science fiction novels The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man and Fahrenheit 451.

The Martian Chronicles (1950) is a book of linked stories that chronicle the exploration, expedition, invasion, colonization and eventual desertion of Mars. The Illustrated Man (1951) is a collection of 18 stories that touch on social topics such as racism, religion and warfare, each introduced by a tattooed man whose changing illustrations foretell the future if one sticks around long enough. Fahrenheit 451 (1953) is a dark story about an anti-intellectual society that discourages independent thinking and forbids reading. The fire department exists to set fire to books and libraries. Guy Montag, a reformed fireman, joins a nomadic clan of booklovers who memorize pieces of civilization’s greatest literature, awaiting the day when they are able to transfer the words onto paper without fear of death.

The Pulitzer Special Citation recognizes an artist’s lifetime achievement. Bradbury, who started writing stories on butcher paper as a child, is still going strong at 87. It is easy to see how Bradbury fit the bill.

Links:

Search the JCLC catalog for Bradbury's works

Visit the library's Biography Resource Center for a complete listing of Bradbury's achievements (library card is required)

1 comment:

susan said...

I found some great fiction book reviews. You can also see those reviews in Science fiction short story